Submitting Assignments in Schoolgy

Variations on a theme.

There are several ways to give assignments when we create them in Schoology. My experience with this currently is that these options are great; however, they are ever so slightly nuanced, and it takes teachers new to working with assignments time to understand these differences. Primarily the differences are in giving feedback, and how students engage in revision. 

We’re going to look at two ways to do this: Schoology Assignments & Schoology Assignments with Google Drive integration.

We’ll take a look at the how to set them up, the student view, as well as the ways feedback works in each.

Schoology Assignments:

Students can upload from a desktop computer, can create inside of Schoology, or can submit from resources along with a  built in app, like Google Drive, which is how most of our students perform submissions on their Chromebooks.

As teacher, when you get such an assignment submitted:

  • Can provide feedback using an annotation tool which allows for highlighting, on screen marking and commenting.
  • A draw back…for teacher who want students to revise work based on comments, students cannot make changes to “submitted” document. Students can view comments, but have to go back to the original assignment to make edits and revisions._3 Ways to Submit an Assignment in Schoology

Schoology Assignments with google drive integration:

I’m going to share my personal practice when I use this feature. Before going into Schoology to create the assignment, I go into Drive, and to the folder where I store materials for the class and the unit I’m working on.

I’ve made it a habit to start assignment directions in Google drive, making sure to give the assignment a specific title. I’ll spend time in the Doc writing and revising the assignment, until it’s ready for my students.

If I’m having the students answer questions, I’ll give the questions, and a direction that tells them to begin their answers in the space between the question. If it’s an essay, I’ll give a direction that says “Start the Essay on the Next Page.” I do this because in digital environments, not only do we need to give directions about the knowledge they need to demonstrate, but also the procedures for how to complete the work.

With this done, I’ll now go into Schoology, open the folder, where I want to place the assignment, add the assignment, but I click the Google search for the assignment title, and insert it.
This makes it easier to track assignment progress and completion, give feedback in the moment, and share work on a smart board, projector, or Google Cast for Education.

_3 Ways to Submit an Assignment in Schoology (1)

_3 Ways to Submit an Assignment in Schoology (2)


  1. Here I don’t have the Schoology annotation tools. I can’t easily line-edit or use editing symbols that I might on a piece of paper.
  2. Most of the feedback I give in this system, is through making comments in the margins, at the top or bottom of the doc.
  3. Additionally, we’ve found that when students review their docs, they assume that clicking “resolve comment” is enough to fix your suggestions or edits.
  4. In co-taught classrooms, the teacher who created the assignment will only be able to see the student work.

There isn’t one right way to give assignments in Schoology. It’s nice to have two ways to do this for different situations.

Here’s a comparison of the two kinds of assignment submissions. 
Remember that working in an LMS like Schoology is a learning process. How you use it will evolve as your understanding of how it will helps you grow, and how it will serve your students.

Work Smarter, Not Harder: Schoology Pages

I’m setting out and trying something new–a podcast. Here’s some of my thinking on using Schoology Pages to create a culture to foster student responsibility.

In reflecting on pages, I realized that I was lumping together to concepts, which really need to be differentiated. These two terms are student-centered and student-responsibility. In student-centered learning, students have choice, authority and autonomy, in different degrees, over topics, voice, products, content. Teachers should work whenever possible to create such environments. However, student-responsibility should always be at play. It’s the student responsibility to know directions, expectations, outcomes, and the details of the course once they are provided to them. Schoology pages makes it possible to create an environment where student-responsibility is always possible.

I won’t say anything else here about Schoology page, but I do want to comment that podcasting and creating videos is brand new territory for me. I don’t know if what I’ve created above fits the definition of podcast, it was longer than the tech tips I’ve been creating for teachers I work with, and thus I landed on this word. I’m also tired of the phrase “Work Smarter, Not Harder.” In terms of videos and podcasting, I hope to do some more and I hope to get way better.






10 Easy Approaches to (Start) Using Schoology

I’m always looking for ways to maximize the tools that I have at my disposal. Schoology is one example of this. As an LMS, it’s so rich. I’m always finding new ways to put it to use.

While there are a lot of great web-based, tech tools out there, I find it better when I don’t have to learn something new, when something that I already own will do the trick. That way, I keep my students where they have comfort and a degree of literacy, my technology director is happy we’re getting the most from what we’ve paid for, and those I coach don’t get overwhelmed with another new thing.

No matter if you are a seasoned Schoology user, or perhaps looking to get a foothold, this post has something for you.

1. Updates

Updates is probably the feature I use most in Schoology. These are quick reminders for students about a homework assignment, a poke about a field trip permission slip, or a clarification on a project that you want to make sure everyone gets.

Screenshot 2018-03-06 at 4.33.07 PM

I like to keep a running list of updates so that I have a record of what I’ve posted, and when I use the announcement button, which is defaulted in Schoology so that parents automatically see the update, I know that all my stakeholders are getting the information.

Here’s my weekly “Tech Tip” on course updates:

2. Course Options Menu

Most teachers seem to overlook this juicy little nugget. That’s too bad. It’s got great stuff in it. Take some time to orient yourself to what’s there.

Screenshot 2018-03-06 at 4.43.04 PM

3. Send Message

This feature is relatively new to me. Mistakenly, I thought that “Send Message” did the same thing as the message button on the main toolbar. When I use “Send Message” everyone in that class–students, parents, other admins–get an email message. For years, I’ve been using the Campus Messenger feature in Infinite Campus to give updates to parents. Now, I’m going to start to switch over to “Send Message.” You can see this feature under “Course Options” in the image above.

4. Messages

This is probably the second most used feature. All of my outside of class communication with students now goes through these messages.

5. Hyperlinks

Using hyperlinks, and teaching others to use hyperlinks, is my mission on earth. Here’s why: hyperlinks create a user friendly design experience. Your audience doesn’t need to be told to go and look at something, because when you hyperlink, you give them direct access to what you want them to look at.

The link to my YouTube video gives some instruction on using hyperlinks.

6. Embedding

Like hyperlinks, embedding content creates a slick looking design and keeps your students inside of your assignments and pages. You can embed almost anything into Schoology: Youtube videos, Google Docs and Slides, even Smore newletters! (Click here to see my post on this).

7. Shared Folders

Do you work on a grade-level or subject area team? If so, as you are creating course materials and content, you’ll want to share this with those you collaborate with. Don’t make a group to share materials.

That’s an okay solution.

Schoology Groups are great when you want to have discussions online and in an asynchronous fashion, but when you want to share, it’s hard to find where these materials are in resources. Instead create a shared folder in Resources. Watch my “Tech Tip” on how to get this done.

8. Public Resources

Looking for something new to do with your students when those March doldrums hit? Check out the wealth of materials that teachers share in Public Resources. While there’s a lot of junk in these resources, you can find gems that will give you ideas about how to use Schoology to work for you.

9. Links

Schoology doesn’t do it all for me. I use tools such as Padlet and Flipgrid in my classes. To get my students to the right place on the web, I share links to these spaces, so they post, create or share where I want them to.

I use Padlet quite a bit when students are submitting digital media or web-based projects. They simple provide a link to these projects, and I can access them. Why don’t I have them turn these links in as a Schoology assignment? Sometimes I do, for sure! But, when I want students to look at their peer’s digital making, I have to have a way that they can access these creations easily. Padlet provides this affordance.

10. Publishing/Unpublishing

Remember that Schoology is an LMS or Learning Management System. You control how your students are going to consume content. To help with this, use the small, green circle in the editing windows to hide or make available materials.

In closing…

There are a lot of great tools out there, but an LMS such as Schoology provides a number of simple tools that will provide teachers with great ways to connect with students and families, provide ease of access to course materials, and collaborate with peers.

Infographics: One Genre with Multiple Uses in the Writing Classroom

A year ago, I wrote a blog on my first foray into having students create infographics in one of my courses, and the benefits of those texts as part of synthesizing sources before writing longer, source-based essays.

A year later, I’m back in and kicking it to the next level. Since then, I’m coming back having done some further reading and work on teaching this text. In terms of research to prepare for this, here’s what I read:

In these sources, the authors put forth a convincing case for the power of using infographics for their malleability to a variety of writing situations and purposes. I would highly recommend them, and I say this as I am quickly shredding my copies from overuse.

Back to English 101:

For several weeks, students are reading and watching sources on food systems in the United States in preparation for writing an essay with the purpose of informing. I use the infographic as one step in a process–it brings students to synthesize their sources around a focused topic.

Returning to this assignment for the second year, I made several upgrades to the assignment. First, students would ultimately produce these digitally. Second, I used our LMS, Schoology, to create a page of resources and suggested process for my students.

On this page, I included a mentor study with accompanying texts, Youtube videos on design principles and using PowerPoint to create these texts, as well as links to other free web tools for designing. The page breaks the creation of the infographic into (suggested) discrete steps, with check-in points at each stage so I could monitor student progress. I made a significant design change to this page, which I’ll discuss later.


My Schoology page for Infographics


We spent a little less than a week working through the creation of these texts. Here are some of the products:




Moving on:

I was pretty pleased with the assignment, the process I laid out, the resources students were accessing to help them.

I decided to assign this as a task in my elective, Media Maker, as one part of an unit on the Role of Technology in education. Students had already written blogs on their ideas of the value of on-line classes and coursework, engaged in creating various media texts on this subject. However, I wanted them to keep going, and to have them re-purpose their largely text-based writing into new a new form. The infographic would push them to think about how to convey information visually.

However, in this class, students got quickly lost in the steps laid out on my Schoology page. Quick fix: I turned each step into an assignment in Schoology, with something concrete to submit. I also added one element to the student assignment. Because we’re a class that functions completely digitally, we created survey questions, and used student’s social media to distribute the questions, collect responses, and create drafts of the graphics in Google Slides.

What I’m seeing in working with infographics as a student-produced text is that we can use them at any part of a writing process. They can be a formative tool used to synthesize information before turned to more in-depth, formal essays. Or, we can really see them as a valid summative assessment tool that students produce at the end of research, or a way for students to repurpose or re-genre their work.



Schoology: The First Two Weeks

I was inspired to write this post after reading Rich Colosi’s blog article, “Six Tips for Starting Your Schoology Course.” For those who are new to using a Learning Management System (LMS), such as Schoology, you’ll find his tips on getting your classes set up and running helpful. Also, people should read Dylan Rodger’s blog, which offers solid ways that units can be organized. You may find it helpful to read these article before continuing into this post.

This is at least my third year starting with an LMS; however, it’s a first for me to be a paid subscriber and to have the full Enterprise version of Schoology with the capability to be used by all students and teachers at Canandaigua Academy. While the set up of my classes wasn’t impacted by this, the results long-term impacts of this integration building wide are, for me,

I’ve found that setting up my classes in Schoology isn’t a whole lot different from the moves that I make when setting up a regular classroom. It takes some planning foresight, logical organization, and a committment to creating working long-term program.

Here are some things that I do:

  1. Build it and they will come. It’s important that when bringing students to an LMS, there has to be content there for them to work with, and there’s purpose for why students are there. Make sure you have either a calendar populated, folders with course content in them, even if it’s as repository system, an assignment to turn in, a quiz to take, a discussion to contribute to.

Without it, where’s the rationale for using the tool. So, it means that the teacher needs to have  some reasons to use Schoology. What I recommend is to pick one way that you can use it, do it, and then add other purposes as the year goes on.

2. Like what Colossi suggests, organize by folders and create a numbering system. Can’t agree more. However, content is organized, work to give students a guide. When I go into Schoology the first time with my students, we open the folder for the first unit, I direct them to the first page in the folder. It’s a unit plan or outline to follow, and each item in the unit is given a task, goal or quest number. See below:


Each of these items is then linked to the assignment, video, link that they need to accomplish. What I’ve found is that students can independently move through the tasks, I can assist where necessary, as well as give target dates on where they should be in the module, and spend class time in conferences with students. An ordering system like this also makes it easy for kids who weren’t in class to figure out what they need to accomplish.

While I don’t share it here with students, simply to try to keep it streamlined, I have each of these tasks linked to a Common Core standard.

3. No substitutions. One of my fears when starting to use a LMS was that students would have problems with the technology or wouldn’t be able to find materials, or that they just wouldn’t work. When students came to me and said, ” I couldn’t find this,” or “It didn’t work,” I was pretty accommodating and took things in paper, made extra paper copies, and allowed excuses.

As I’ve grown more comfortable, I’ve stopped that enabling. Once it’s made clear that this is the mode by which business will be conducted, these problems disappear. Teachers shouldn’t have to apologize for their planning, how they give resources, or the integration of technology into the classroom. Additionally, at all levels we need to stop rationalizing, privileging and normalizing the idea that “Computers don’t like me.”

4. Model. With the above in mind, I realized that anything I wanted to do in Schoology, I had to teach and model. Once I showed them how to submit an assignment, I knew they could do it, and then there were no excuses. We do this with other things, so why not with this? Link students with the Schoology help menu, which is rich in resources for how to do things. Teaching students to use help menus is a valuable skill in terms of self-reliance in a 21st century world.

5. Reward. In trying to gamify the first module in one of my courses, I reward students with 24 hour extensions for completing groups of tasks, which I call levels. This has been an inexpensive means to reinforce routines, procedures and tools that we’ll be using. Kids want the small tokens I give them and the badges I developed. Schoology let me monitor and keep this system organized.

My strategy in working with cool new tools and strategies has always been to jump in and see what happens. After the class ends, assess the fall-out and then make it better. If you take this approach, and you’re jumping into Schoology, just keep going, building, and making it better for you and your students.

For those who move with more caution, then, consider the above, and then just start, go slow, figure out how it will work for you.

Either way, keep going and making the classroom better for you and your students.