Blogging & Personalized Learning

The following are notes from a presentation I made on May 16, at Wayne-Finger Lakes BOCES during a conference on Personalized Learning. The notes have been revised into their current form and to be read. 


Introduction

What I’d like to propose today that all teachers and students should begin to blog. Blogging, in all its forms, varieties, and definitions, its glorious uncertain malleability, is the perfect vehicle for personalized learning. 

While I’m doing this, I’ll also take a look at the teacher considerations for blogging with students, including a look at the platforms available for blogging [However, for the purposes of this post, I do not go into that part of my presentation]

I’ll talk about the how I blog as a educator, the roll blogging plays in the work of teachers and students, some look at various platforms and how I use blogs in several of my English classes. The talk will move every so slightly beyond blogging to look at how I use a variety of tools in working with students to teach writing and communication skills.

Using these apps–like those in G-suite or Flipgrid–in concert together allows me to create a classroom space where students have a high degree of choice over the topics that they learn about, are able to move at their own pace.

As I work to talk about my beliefs and practices around blogging, I want to begin with several disclaimers:

First, I have great reservations about speaking at a personalized learning confernece, because I don’t really know what it is, and if what I do with some of my students reflects what this is.

After the conference proposal for this talk was accepted, I went out onto the web, to see if I could figure out what personalized learning was. According to Sean Cavanaugh, associate editor as Education Week, personalized learning is teaching that meets students needs, there are competency-based progression, flexible learning environments, high expectations but choice in paths to follow, and works in conjunction with a learner profile that records student strengths, needs, motivations, and goals. And, while this was a jumping off point to me, I myself see personalized learning as a teacher creating an environment where students are able to learn and to explore what they want to learn about, while engaging in learning behaviors that enable them to become life-long learners, and autodidact in nature.

Second, I make no claims about the value or worth of my blog or my blogging or of the blogging that I ask my students to do. You might have your device in hand currently, and are looking to find my wordpress blog, read it, and say, there’s some real crap there. That’s true. And, what I would argue, is that this is good thing. Blogging isn’t about the perfect end, the finely editing, perfected piece. It’s about learning in all it’s glory. And, this is why we should do it.

What is a blog? 

There are 2 answers to this question. 

So, a blog is essentially a website which you have complete control over in terms of form and content. Its appearance, design, and layout are largely determined by you. In this context, there are blog posts and blog pages. Blog posts are generally more dynamic because they grow and scroll depending on how much content you put into them. Pages are static, and contain information about specific topics: for example, I have a page that I update on what I’m doing, a page about running in the Fingerlakes, and about lessons and projects that I do. Depending on the platform you are blogging on, you will have more control and options, and if you start to invest money, the possibilities of what you can do on your blog increase.

I think the best introduction to blogging either for yourself or to show to other people, I would recommend this video:

Second, there is the blog, or blog-post, this is a piece of writing that shows up on your blog, and that has some kind of message. A reflection on your day, on a lesson that you taught, an argument for an educational practice, a list of the best books for the first ½ of the 2018 year. While blogs share rhetorical characteristics of their analog counterparts–they are written for a range of purposes, such as informative, argumentative, analytical or evaluative–they are a communicative genre in their own right. The structure of the blog post is different from an essay, there is the ability to create posts that are multi-modal in nature and include video, audio, image, and because they are written for the web, they can be hyperlinked, include embedded documents, and provide an experience which allows for the readers to interact with the writing itself by access the media, but also, commenting and adding to what is written.

The Value & Importance of the Teacher-Blogger

But, one of the best ways we create pathways for personalized learning is through blogging as teachers. By creating a blog, we give ourselves a place to write down our thoughts, to reflect on what we are learning in our classrooms, to record lessons. But we also have a space where we can connect with others and follow and read their blogs.

As George Couros, author of the Innovator’s Mindset, writes that the value in blogging is “To share, to develop and to archive. “Couros goes so far to say that it’s the job of educators to blog. To quickly summarize his argument, he claims that if reflection is a key part of our practice, a required part of our practice, then blogging is a way to reflect, sharing our voice, and being accountable to others.

In a post from Couros’ “The Principal of Change” blog published in November of 2014, he says that blogs can:

  1. Focus on growth and showcase
  2. Opportunity to focus on literacy
  3. Use wide array of literacy
  4. Develop and auidence.
  5. Develop and nurture voice.

As teacher-bloggers, we are modeling an important process for our students, we are modeling the process of life-long learning and being auto-didactic, if personalized learning is the act of becoming auto-didactic.

Our blogs can act as models for student about the learning process. How we research and collect sources, how we curate these resources, the development of the products that we make for our classes. We can model for them how we ourselves create products.

So, a blog, the writing we put there is important in nurturing our own personalized learning, and to show students that we our learners ourselves.

Of course, this opens us to the exact kinds of scrutiny that we as educators don’t like. Many of us are private about what goes on in the classroom, we fear others coming to observe us because we fear the criticism and evaluation that can come from this.

There are other problems. If I’m reflecting on a lesson that goes badly on my blog, does this reflection include lack of participation from my students or their lack of engagement. As teacher-bloggers, we need to consider our content and its connection to our audience in ways that we might never have before. 

The Value of Blogging with Students

What can we do with blogs with our students? And, how does blogging help us to develop more personalized learning?

As with educator blogging I discussed above, blogs offer an opportunity to record their thinking, and gives them a reflection space.

Blogs offer students a research space as they might be exploring ideas for a project, they can write about what they spent their time reading, and what questions they have and what questions they found answers to.

Blogs offer students authenticity. They are written for a community or public (more on this in a minute) and they are going to be read. If you are not going to let students publish their blogs to be read by at least other students, they should write in a different format and venue. At least let other students read, but perhaps consider finding avenues for other teachers, parents, and other students in the building read. Edublogs makes this possible in the sharing settings of the classes you create.

Blogs can also be a portfolio space. Students can create project pages, these pages can contain picture of process, final products, a reflect that is either text-based, or in some other mode like audio or video.

Blogs with students become an important artifact.  Couros writes that all students leaving high school should have the following: a personal learning network, an about me page and x…We can help students cultivate their online presences and develop a digital footprint that represents the best about their academic selves.

Blogs offer a chance to write real-world texts for current trends in media. They are not essays. They are unique, and if students are going to be competitive in 21st century economies, they have to know how to produce real-world texts.

These elements are all possible by using a blog.

Things to Consider

When we are deciding to work with blogging with our students, here are the things we have to decide.

The following image sums up these considerations nicely:

Personalized Learning_ Blogging

Duration–for one unit or for whole year?

Privacy–Who will have access to reading posts? Commenting…required or suggested/asked.

Content–Does the teacher provide topics or do students find their own?

Reflection–How and when do students learn from the experience? 

Quality–Finely polished summative pieces, or works in progress as part of students process?

Control–Who maintains and supervises? Of course the teacher, but to what degree? 

What is the value in a student blog? Certainly, the value and the dangers and pitfalls are the same. When students are “naughty” we have problems with codes of conduct, there can be threats to security and to privacy. At the same time, we have the ability to raise these conversations with students within the context of them become makers for the web. We turn them from consumers of YouTube videos, and empower them by giving them a space where they can make and create.

 We need to look at the kinds of blogging we can do.

Are we going to create a class blog, one in which the teachers control all aspects. A teacher posts an assignment or question, and students post comments or responses to this. The teacher can moderate these posts, and as the posts go up, others in the class can view and comment.

Another way to blog with students is to create an actual blog for each student, where the student has control over the format, appearance, layout and content. What the blog gets filled with is up to the teacher, beause of assignments, but in open-ended assignments, we have the opportunity.

 

 

 

 

 

Infographics: One Genre with Multiple Uses in the Writing Classroom

A year ago, I wrote a blog on my first foray into having students create infographics in one of my courses, and the benefits of those texts as part of synthesizing sources before writing longer, source-based essays.

A year later, I’m back in and kicking it to the next level. Since then, I’m coming back having done some further reading and work on teaching this text. In terms of research to prepare for this, here’s what I read:

In these sources, the authors put forth a convincing case for the power of using infographics for their malleability to a variety of writing situations and purposes. I would highly recommend them, and I say this as I am quickly shredding my copies from overuse.

Back to English 101:

For several weeks, students are reading and watching sources on food systems in the United States in preparation for writing an essay with the purpose of informing. I use the infographic as one step in a process–it brings students to synthesize their sources around a focused topic.

Returning to this assignment for the second year, I made several upgrades to the assignment. First, students would ultimately produce these digitally. Second, I used our LMS, Schoology, to create a page of resources and suggested process for my students.

On this page, I included a mentor study with accompanying texts, Youtube videos on design principles and using PowerPoint to create these texts, as well as links to other free web tools for designing. The page breaks the creation of the infographic into (suggested) discrete steps, with check-in points at each stage so I could monitor student progress. I made a significant design change to this page, which I’ll discuss later.

screenshot-2016-12-15-at-12-16-51-pm

My Schoology page for Infographics

 

We spent a little less than a week working through the creation of these texts. Here are some of the products:

infographics

illegal-immigration-

101obesity-101

Moving on:

I was pretty pleased with the assignment, the process I laid out, the resources students were accessing to help them.

I decided to assign this as a task in my elective, Media Maker, as one part of an unit on the Role of Technology in education. Students had already written blogs on their ideas of the value of on-line classes and coursework, engaged in creating various media texts on this subject. However, I wanted them to keep going, and to have them re-purpose their largely text-based writing into new a new form. The infographic would push them to think about how to convey information visually.

However, in this class, students got quickly lost in the steps laid out on my Schoology page. Quick fix: I turned each step into an assignment in Schoology, with something concrete to submit. I also added one element to the student assignment. Because we’re a class that functions completely digitally, we created survey questions, and used student’s social media to distribute the questions, collect responses, and create drafts of the graphics in Google Slides.

What I’m seeing in working with infographics as a student-produced text is that we can use them at any part of a writing process. They can be a formative tool used to synthesize information before turned to more in-depth, formal essays. Or, we can really see them as a valid summative assessment tool that students produce at the end of research, or a way for students to repurpose or re-genre their work.

 

 

Infographics, Synthesis and Informational Writing

As part of my FYC, English 101 class, my students read a wide range of sources, provided by me, about the industrial food system. We’re reading Pollan, Schlosser, Moss to name a few.

Once we’re through some preliminary discussion, which happens both in writing and as part of full-class discussion, it’s time for some assessment. I want to know what they’re thinking, and how they see these sources in conversation.

This year, as part of a formative assessment in reading and synthesis assignment, I’m having my kids create info-graphics to meet these needs. This is the assignment I came up with:

Infographic Rubric

I took a couple of weeks to design this and it owes a great debt to the work on Kathy Schrock’s webpage. Anyone who is thinking about working with infographics or is currently work with them, should check our her page. There’s almost too much there.

 

Update on the Single Point Rubric

Forty-eight hours away from taking my first writing project in my English 101, fresh college composition class, and those single-point rubrics are coming into play heavily. As my students and I come into the finish line, there are lots of questions:

“Do I need to use dialogue?”

“What should I include in my writing process folder?”

“What’s in the cover letter?”

The easiest thing for me to do is to point students back to the project’s single column rubrics for either process or paper. It’s a quick reminder for students of the qualities that the work should show to be “At Standard.”

For ambitious students, such a rubric provides a clear starting point for how to excel and go beyond the basics to achieve mastery. Furthermore, it prompts students to figure out for themselves independently how to achieve this level.

For struggling and reluctant writers, a teacher no longer needs to enter a debate about the levels necessary to “pass.” Nor do teachers need to enter into a pseudo-debate in an attempt to goad students into writing more.

In both cases, a teacher has a clear, direct rubric to form the foundations of a conversation for improvement.

The last several days before a writing project comes due are given over to “workshop” days. I turn the classroom space and time over to students to finalize projects, collect process materials, reflect on their writing in a cover letter. I don’t teach anything new, and I may only review certain concepts as I move around the class and look over shoulders and see what patterns I see in work. At this stage, it’s more important to just be there as a resource to students.

On a final note, the use of Canvas has been invaluable. While I’ve used the tool the past two years, making use of the “module” function has been essential in keeping this writing project super organized with all of it’s materials, pages, files–and giving students continued access to all of this media. Awesome.