Hybrid Learning: Two Models to Ponder

Here’s the introduction to what I’m fumbling through today:

First, I want to start with two resources that have reinforced or shaped the thinking that is going on here. Start by going to the Global Online Academy to explore their resources. Then, check out The Emergency Online Blog. Caufield’s video “How I would approach the fall semester” is a much watch, and has helped with the models I’m conceptualizing here. While he’s writing to a university audience, his structure has merits for the K-12 population.

Continuing to build routines and procedures

At the start of any school year, setting up the organization of the classroom is an important part of classroom management. The organization of the course in our LMS is essential. Below is a mock-up of what my Schoology course will look like in the opening week:

In this mock-up, I’ve included essential items that will always be present within my course: a link to “office hours,” a “Help Desk” folder with How-to videos on technology related items, and a dedicated parent folder with the course syllabus and FAQ document or page. The entire course can be viewed on the screen. There’s no scrolling down to see items on the page.

There’s also a folder for the content of the week. The folder is dated, and the items within the folder have specific names and due dates included in the titles. Notice that there’s no links to PDFs or other documents. In the “Take the Quiz on the Syllabus,” I would embed a link to the syllabus within the quiz. While every grade level is different, I do very little reading of documents and review of documents and directions to students. With something like a syllabus, I would expect students to read it on their own, come to class with questions for clarification, and then take a quiz to show that they had read the document. This kind of move is even more important in the coming year where I’ll have little time in a face-to-face setting.

As I move week to week, I will either unpublished old folders or put older materials in to “Previous Weeks” so students can access.

This organization and design will be present and it’ll be maintain consistently. From the first day, students see the organization, it can be reviewed with them in those first classes. In this way, I’m setting a routine for them and how they access materials. I also build credibility with them–I’m organized, I’m taking care of you, and I have the forethought to put this together in a way you can easily consume. It’s another foothold for our relationship building when we get to the academic part.

What I’ve described above is one way in which Schoology can be used in a streamlined way that’s easy for students to consume. I have some other suggestions that I’ll get to in future blog posts.

Two Approaches to the Hybrid:

In my introduction, I summarized the current plan the district has to bring students back into the buildings through a hybrid schedule. Some students two days of the week and other students on opposite days. In the graphic below, I puzzle on how this might look:

Reflection on these models:

  1. Once I decide which of these to pursue, I would stick to the plan for the first quarter, and then assess through self-reflection and discussion with families and students.
  2. In-depth formative assessment is essential. The need to know where students are at when they are coming to a class session helps to give the best chance at developing a lesson plan to address those needs. Sure, quizzes and other objective measure are one part of this. But, I also see email, discussions, Flipgrids, and video chats being important to collect the “What do you need me to talk about in class today?” This is making me think that I need to model these student input pieces and make some procedures for them in those first weeks. I’m totally leaning towards Flipgrid as the go to tool for this, as students don’t necessarily need to be in their video.
  3. What is the best use of class time? In the above diagram, I use the phrase “Essential Direction Instruction.” While I’m an advocate for video lessons and students learning through watching video, there are times when I have a piece of content that I want a live audience for because there are always immediate clarifying questions or my need to check for understanding.
  4. As a writing teacher, the workshop model is valuable. In this model, the teacher provides some instruction at the beginning of the class, and then the students spend the rest of the time working on applying that concept into the writing they are working on. When students work, the teacher then is free to circulate to check on the application of the material, work 1:1 with the students, or conduct writing conferences. Is this the best use of class time in the cohort model? It seems less so in the “Zoomflex,” and perhaps even problematic.
  5. In his video, Caufield speaks to the use of breakout rooms as part of a class meeting, so that students can collaborate and connect. Additionally, if there are students in the physical room, they could socially distance by each joining a different breakout room. This will take some work to fully conceptualize and to figure out how to manage productively with high school students. However, I do see the application in a literature classroom for discussion, for peer conferencing, multimedia project planning. I also like the idea that in the “Zoomflex” we build an attitude of “together, apart.”
  6. My takeaway from items four and five above, is that class time should really focus on student interaction. Discussion, collaborative activities, and stuff that can’t be done through a screen. Like many, by April of last spring, I felt burned on virtual meetings. Given what we’re facing in the coming year, there will be lots of virtual and lots of video. If possible, can we use class time to reduce digital technology use, and be a bit analog in our work and in our relationship building.
  7. Does the cohort model essentially double the preparation load? I don’t think so, but I certainly will be grading each day to make sure I can be on top of where students are at. This works fine for me. I’m not someone who can sit for hours to grade all the students I’m responsible for in one sitting. Also, some of the “grading” is really assessment checks to guide lessons, and may not necessarily need the clerk-work of grade assigning or recording. This is another reason I like video responses from students in Flipgrid.

This is a good start at capturing the two models as I see them currently and at starting to evaluate their effectiveness. Sorry, no outro video today, but maybe next time. Do you have other ideas for how it might look in the hybrid model or what other models for the school year have you heard about there. Leave a comment or DM me.

The First Day

Let’s start with a quick introduction to this post:

I won’t be the first to say it, but sometimes a book finds you at the right place and time. For me, this serendipity happened last week when Doug Fisher, Nancy Frey, and John Hattie’s new book came onto my radar. For anyone who is thinking about how to build a successful school year, you’ve got to get this book in your hands. When I bought my copy, I purchased the digital, Kindle version and saved myself at least $15.

Image

Why the right book at the right time? Well, they captured my feelings about the first several weeks of school and what I’ve got to ready myself for in September. My previous post starts to reflect on the important moves that I’ll need to make in September, but I appreciated the way that Fisher, Frey and Hattie capture this in the success criteria in “Module 2: The First Days of School.” I’ve listed them below and the language in the parenthesis is mine:

I can establish norms for students.

I can develop class agreements.

I can identify (a)synchronous distance learning classroom expectations. 

I can teach organizational and procedural routines (and tech tools). 

I know my students’ names and interests. 

What follows is how I’ll try to accomplish these items.

What do I want to accomplish in the first day? 

In the past, when I thought about the first day, I wanted to do three things. First, let students get to know me a little. Second, let students get to know each other. Third, introduce a procedure that we would be using almost everyday in class. 

Here’s what I do. The activity is called “Frayer a Friend.” The idea comes from the great tech blogger, Matt Miller. The idea is simple. Students find a partner, conduct a short interview of each other, and then after a designated amount of time, introduce their partner to the class using the information gained in the interview. I actually model the activity by sharing a frayer that I completed with information about me. At the end of the activity, I’ve accomplished all the goals I listed above. 

By sharing the model, I’ve introduced myself and shown a bit of my personality. Because of the nature of the interview process, students have a low risk way of sharing something about themselves, and because their partners introduce them, they don’t have to talk about themselves.

Using our LMS, Schoology, I put the assignment, linked above as a Google Drawing, in as a Schoology Google Drive assignment. Once students go into the assignment, they see how I will give them materials in Schoology, how to open them, and then when we are done, they also know how to submit. Routine 1: Accessing and Submitting Assignments…check!

However, I get a bonus here, because using a Frayer as a concept attainment strategy is something I use throughout the year. When I get into my first set of vocabulary, we use the Frayer as a way of learning terms and sharing them. Kids already know the template!

Now, doing this in a face-to-face class is probably pretty straight forward. Doing this in a synchronous session in a virtual meeting is also easy, if you have the ability to do a breakout session. Asynchronously, it gets a little more tricky, and honestly, if I had to do asynchronous, I would choose a different activity.

A note on routines and procedures

What are the routines and procedures that are essential for your instruction and that you train students on in the first weeks of school? While everyone has individualized procedures matching personality, content, and grade level, there are some core items that everyone does: 

  1. What do you do when you come into the classroom? 
  2. Where do you put your stuff? 
  3. What should be the items on your desk at the start of class? 
  4. How does the teacher give signals about when to focus? 
  5. How do you access materials? 
  6. How do you turn them in? 
  7. What do you do when you need help? 
  8. How do you move about the room? 
  9. How do you work in groups? 
  10. When is it okay to talk to a peer? 
  11. When can I pack my stuff up and leave? 

There are probably a lot of others that you’ll have. Please leave them in the comments. Some may be asking, but what if I’m teaching remotely? Think about the list above rewritten for virtual classrooms and meetings: 

  1. What should you do when you get into a Zoom meeting? 
  2. What should be in the camera view when in a Zoom meeting? 
  3. Before the Zoom meeting, what should you do to be ready? 
  4. During a Zoom meeting, how do you let the teacher know you have a question or want to participate? 
  5. How is the course organized in our LMS or website? 
  6. How do you get into and out of breakout rooms? 
  7. How do you get help outside of Zoom? When is it okay to talk to peers about work?
  8. When is it okay to leave the Zoom meeting? 

The moves are the same. I’m also asking these as questions because everyone’s answer is going to be a little different. When I’m in a physical classroom presenting material to students, sometimes I want questions from students as I go, and sometimes I want them to hold them until the end of the instruction. In a Zoom, sometimes, I want them to use the chat, and sometimes, I disable it. Context is everything, right? 

However, looking at the above list of questions, one thing that I know I need to do is to generate a document that has my Zoom meeting expectations, and I need to develop either an activity to practice this, and I might also need to build in a conversation about Zoom meetings as part of our class agreements. Developing class agreements is a post for another day.

Also, looking at the list above, I need to develop an FAQ page for students and parents. I’m not quite ready to do that yet. Currently, my district plan is a hybrid model where students come on different days of the week, so I still don’t have a concrete picture of how the schedule will look, developing an FAQ that listed how I will give help outside of class isn’t clear. However, according to Fisher, Frey and Hattie, good FAQ documents for the coming year will respond to the following: 

  1. Where can I find weekly and monthly schedules? 
  2. Where do I find assignments and materials? 
  3. How do I submit work? 
  4. How do I find graded work and comments? 
  5. When can I get help? 
  6. How do I get technical help?

This is a helpful list, and one that combined with the procedures, would give us even more to think about in terms of our training of students. 

More on connecting to students and learning their interests

An activity such as the Frayer interview I describe above is an easy way to start to get to know kids. They’ve submitted their interviews, so later I can pull them up and use them to guide my work. However, I want to start to get to know them and their interests more deeply.

Interest surveys abound and are a good way to continuing the process. However, I want to dig in a little more deeply.

Two things I’m considering are below. These activities move beyond that first day of class, first encounter with students.

  1. Five-things listicle blog: In it’s simplest form, students write a “blog” post on their five favorite songs and explain about why that song is so important to them. It’s easy to give choice here, too, and allow them to write about any form of media. I use the term blog loosely, because not everyone is going to have a blog. Instead, I’m suggesting that given the technology available, students can embed links to YouTube videos to create a multimodal composition.
  2. Using Robin Bowman’s It’s Complicated, students continue with their interviewing, and create something more long form and personal. Thanks for the idea from Marchetti and O’Dell in their excellent book Beyond Literary Analysis.

Some final thoughts

Learning from Learning: Documentation and Blogging

It sounded like a good idea at the time: The Documentation Project.

The end of August was rolling around and I was starting to think about the school year. What were my goals? What key pieces of instruction did I want to take on? What were going to be important milestones and projects?

In thinking about these questions, Angela Stockman (@AngelaStockman) posted in the Building Better Writers group on Facebook. She was offering a year-long session in documentation of learning, creating, a private group called “The Documentation Project.”

Currents were converging.

The offer of documenting learning would keep me honest about a goal, and perhaps help me to both step up my instruction and really learn from it.

At the end of August, all this sounded like a good idea. Last week, in the middle of a 20-point To-Do list, not so much. Additionally, Angela was pushing us along, asking What we were going to document and how we were going to do. Again, not so much.

However, last week and over the weekend, some stuff kinda gel-d for me. This blog is what I came up with.


I’ve decided to document the learning about writing that goes on in my IB English 11 class. We spent the first 4 days of class creating student run Edublogs, and populating them with several different kinds of posts and pages. Students will blog once a week, writing about either personal interests, mentor-text reading, or in further their thinking about current texts under discussion.

One of the questions that I’m asking about blogs is do blogs and blog writing create better writers.

I see the learning and documentation coming from weekly reflection on what I’m seeing in their blogs, and the lessons that I plan coming from this cycle or process.

For example, in the first round of blogging, I asked students to comment on each other’s blogs. Here, students are in groups of four, commenting on blogs in these groups to keep it manageable.

After the first round of blogs and comments were submitted, I asked students to reflect on what we’ve done so far. Flipgrid was an easy tool for collecting this feedback. The primary feedback I got was that commenting on other student work was the most difficult part of the process.

When I teach giving feedback–whatever kind of feedback that might be–I use the Stanford Design school technique of “I Like, I Wish, I Wonder.” This gives students a way of looking at student work and moving feedback from something personal to something constructive, and that is both positive and critical simultaneously.

Certainly, commenting on the work of others is a challenging task. No one would disagree. It requires us to carefully consider, to understand intention, to think about the effects of writing on our own experience as the consumer of a piece. Then, to articulate those noticings into writing.

Today, we’re going to look at some mentor texts by looking at public comments to the New York Times blogroll to see what we might learn about the moves we need to make as participants in a conversation.

I use that phrase, “participants in a conversation,” intentionally. From looking at blogs and my students reflection on them, my purposes behind blogging with them are clarified. Better writing means, for me, increased engagement in a conversation. I want them to participate with each other in a conversation of ideas and thinking.

Teaching commenting and giving feedback is one way to do this.

The other aspect that’s come clearer for me this weekend, was that blogging, for all its coolness, offers a challenge to today’s high school writer (and perhaps today’s high school English teacher): There is no right way to do it. In a Regents-exam driven classroom, where the answer for how to write the essay is clear and easy to teach, the blog form does not lend itself to “This is how you do it.”

Instead, the blog post is, perhaps, the most complex of rhetorical situations students might have to respond to. Worthy territory for writers, indeed.

What am I doing now?: Professional Development & Personalized Learning

Personalized Learning Conference:

I put final practice on a presentation on making this afternoon on blogging as educators and using blogs with students. You can see a copy of my slides here. I’m going to try to clean up my presentation notes and post them in the next few days.

The other part of my work in the past few days has been around creating a professional development session for the end of the school year. Let me give some details.

Where we started?

I’m planning an end of the year professional development activity. Given the strange timeline of the New York state Regents exams in June, our district has found itself with the unique opportunity to do professional development in the last days of teacher reporting.

While I’m not sure about how other high schools and districts operate, here in Canandaigua, having PD on the last day of school has never happened. Most of the time, the last days of teacher reporting are given to teachers cleaning their rooms, packing away boxes, and when these tasks are done, hallway games of KanJam. The atmosphere, in those last days, silently shouts, “I’m done and checked out until September.”

There is a degree of righteousness in this belief. After all, the school year is a marathon endurance test from which hard-working teachers often limp across the finish line desperately in need of some water and a rest.

In my mind, this feels like a kind of defeat. Can’t we have an end of the year, where we do something to either celebrate what we’ve accomplished, or to think towards the following year and how we’ll build on and trump best practices. For many of our committees and in terms of our district goals, there’s still lots to work. We just finished our first year of a 1:1 Chromebook implementation, a use of Schoology enterprise, and a number of other digital tools. Plus we have wellness initiatives, character education and a movement around engaging students. There’s still plenty of work to do.

In planning this PD, I took in the following considerations:

Goals:

  • Continue to Build capacity for using Schoology.
  • Align to district/DTC/building goals around using Schoology
  • Raise awareness of the Digital Skills Map.
  • End-of-School Year Digital Clean-up.
  • Digital Citizenship?

Considerations:

  • Moral and spiritual support from administration and CALTs: These people have too many responsibilities in the last days of school to be responsible for this event, but at the same time, such a new event needed a top-down approach. 
  • Capped at 2 hour time frame: Again, because this was a new event in our culture, a short, 2 hour time frame was an opportunity to start to build success. 
  • Equitable to other buildings: All of our district buildings are involved in PD for roughly the same amount of time. 
  • Scaled and differentiated to range of skills and talents of our teachers.
  • Anything created in Schoology would need to be replicated in August/September. Will Ts see value in creating in the last 2 days of the school year?
  • Provide CTLE credit
  • Structure of session: Starting point together in auditorium; closure in auditorium; sharing?
  • Who? Teachers? 

Where I’m at with this?

Last Friday, I had my breakthrough.

We’re going to play a game. While this game currently doesn’t have a name, theme, brand or prizes, it does have structure.

Teachers will be placed into teams who will compete for points based on completing different tasks. Inspired by choice boards and the BINGO choice board I learned about at Kasey Bell’s Shakeuplearning.com, I created the following:

 

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Schoology

Help desk hours & location:
Room 121 from 8:30 to 9:30

Post your course syllabus to each of your courses in Schoology or show that you have done this to your current courses.
(Schoology/CA Braves Scavenger Hunt)
Create a series of folders for a Schoology course to get organized or show how you have organized your courses. Create a Schoology page on a topic you are teaching next year. The page must include a hyperlink, a video, and an embedded Google Doc. Learn about a new feature in Schoology like Completion Rules, Conferences or Gradebook. Create something that shows this new knowledge. Access the End of School Year Digital Clean-up resources and complete 3 of  the activities.

Presentations from x at y; z at r; a at b.

Digital Literacy & the

Digital Skills Map

Help desk hours and location:

Dan Bowman & Tracy Lindsay

Access a copy of the District Digital Skills Map (Click here). Highlight skills that you think your students have; underline skills that you work to develop with your students.   Work with others who have shared students (either by department or grade level) to come up with ideas on how you might promote skills in the digital map through lessons or projects next year. Access the Common Sense Media digital resources for teachers (Click here); find lessons or materials that you could use with your students and that have connections to your content area. Put these materials into some form of assignment in Schoology. Check out the following educational bloggers or resources. Find something that you might use in the fall: Shake-Up Learning; Ditch that Textbook; Put the materials into Schoology. Find a group of 5 teachers, read this article and have a short discussion about it.
Assessment

Help Desk:

There are lots of great tech tools for formative assessment: Kahoot, Quizlet, Quizizz, or Schoology. Learn about a new one. Create a 10 question quiz using a new formative assessment tool like Kahoot, Quizlet, or Schoology. Read this article about formative assessement with 5 people and then have a short discussion about it. Share your takeaways on this Flipgrid. Do something you need to do for 10 minutes: make a phone call, schedule an appointment, enter grades, clean-up your room, finish something on the check-out list.   Find someone in a different department, discuss a  formative assessment they use. Share and collaborate on a creating a new format. Create a BINGO Board, like this one or a Tic-Tac-Toe board,  for your students to do next year in one topic or unit. Click here to learn more about choice boards.
Nearpod
Help Desk Location:
Steve Holmes
Access the Nearpod store and find a lesson you can use in September of next year. Add it to your library. Turn a PowerPoint or Slide Deck you use in the fall into an Interactive Nearpod with 5 activities. Create a Nearpod that you can use with parents during Open House next year. Click here to learn more about Nearpod for Parents. Work with others to create. Find someone who has never done a Nearpod, and help them make their first one with at lesat 5 slides and/or activities (both people get points). Look at the collection of Digital Citizenship Nearpod Library. Find one that you can do in the fall with your students. Add it to your library and make edits to work for your class.  
Social Media
Help Desk:
Katie McFarland in Atrium
Set up an educational Twitter account. Follow 5 educators who Tweet in Canandaigua and 5 people outside of Canandaigua. Follow 5 new teachers/educational Twitter users. Tweet about doing the each of the activities you do in this game. Use the hashtag #Canandaiguaproud Create a Twitter activity or assignment that your students could do in your class next year. Click here for ideas about using Twitter with students. Teach someone who doesn’t know about Twitter to set up an account and start Tweeting. Help them tweet about this game using the hashtag #canandaiguaproud and get 5 followers.
Well-being–Connecting & Culture Come up with a new “Get to Know You” activity that you can use in the first few days of school. Share your idea with a teammate. Click here for an article about connecting with students for some ideas. Read this article about mental health first aid with 5 people and then have a short discusison about it. Each group member must share a takeaway on this Flipgrid. There are lots of cool opportunities for professional development over the summer. Click these links to learn about them: Go to the libary, browse the collection and sign out a book to read this summer. See John LaFave’s presentation on mental health first aid.

Go to room x at y; z at t; or a at b.

Health & wellness
See activities for individual times and locations.
Get signed up for Healthy Rewards.

Go to room x at y; z at t; or a at b.

Take a tour of the Fitness Center; got to the center at x or y for the tour. What are your some of your wellness or fitness plans for the summer. Click here to share them in a Flipgrid. Take a golf swing lesson.

Go to the fitness center at x, y or z for a tour.

Looking to get started running?

Listen to X’s tips at x in room.

The chart has a series of topics or threads, which were determined by building and district goals. Activities are ordered left to right, and teachers earn more points for more complicated activities that require collaboration and creation. Once the entire board and its activities are set, we’ll house the board in a page or assignment in Schoology. The entire PD activity will be structured in a folder in our faculty Schoology course. The current iteration of this looks like the following:

Screenshot 2018-05-16 at 8.24.36 AM

In addition to the choice board, teams will have rules to follow, ways to gain bonus points, and chances to block and attack other teams.

I’m finalizing the board, working with others to get a theme, additional bonuses and blockers, and set short presentations.

With this format and structure, I think we have a good chance at success and using time, which is hard to come by, to get our teachers to continue to develop their skills.

What I’ve Been Reading

Here in Canandaigua, there are less than 25 days of school. While I’ve been busy with planning and managing IB exams, a professional development session for Regents exam week, preparing end of year technology integration documents, writing a presentation on blogging and personalized learning, and final units and projects for IB 12 and English 103, I’ve managed to squeeze in a few new books that I thought I’d share.

While there’s a great deal of energy spent in the taking care of all the end-of-year stuff, there’s also some time when I’m saying, “Next year…” As we reflect on what’s happening right now in our classrooms and schools, those moments come when we start to lay the ground work for changes we’ll make when September comes around. With that in mind, these books gave footholds for things that I want to be experimenting with as I move into the summer, and fall.

Below are several loose goals that I’m thinking will drive my work next year and the books that will help.

  1. Teaching composition through the design thinking process:

Read Gamestorming.

gamestorming

This is definitely not a cover-to-cover read. Take a look at the first chapters, and then surf the activities that come after. There’s lots here.

Gamestorming is a book of games and activities facilitators can use for individuals and groups to get them thinking. It’s a simple as that.

Games are grouped into different categories, such as opening, exploring, and closing. All are shaped around design thinking. For the English and composition teacher, there are lots of potentials for helping students to generate topics and to spend time iterating on these ideas.

Last week, I passed the book along to my wife because she does work in human resources, leadership coaching and professional development. This isn’t just an educational book, it’s a book for anyone who wants to create participant-centered thinking spaces in classrooms, in training, or in strategic planning.

2. Asking what we really mean by engagement, how to get kids producing evidence of their engagement, and building a culture of engagement in the classroom.

Our professional development coordinator connected me with Fisher, Frey and Quaglia’s Engagement by Design. Fortunately, she also was able to connect several of us through a Zoom meeting last week with Doug Fisher.

engagement

This books prompts readers to think beyond behavioral engagement and consider how we cognitively engage behavior in learning spaces.

The other book with tie-ins to engagement and classroom culture is The EduProtocol Field Guide: 16 Student-Centered Lesson Frames for Infinite Possibilities.

eduprotocol

Teachers, if you are going to read one book this summer about creating culture and getting students to engage in the work, this is the book for you. The protocols are simple, straightforward and with clear steps for how to do them in the classroom.

3. Technology integration to have students become creators (and really practice the whole 4C thing):

Another book that gives some detailed processes and protocols for thinking about integrating technology paired with the four-Cs, look to Cultivating Communication in the Classroom by Lisa Johnson (@TechChef4U). Because I’m hoping to sharpen instruction around presentation, use of social media, portfolios and curation, this book explores each of these areas with guiding questions for teachers to consider what skills are needed for each area and clear how-tos for a range of ways we build digital communication skills in our students.

Final thoughts:

Each of these books provide ample meat to drive summer thinking and planning. I’m looking forward to looping back through these books in late July and August as I start planning the next school year.